Red-legged frog with Pacific Chorus frog

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dpa-hydrophone-whales-alaska ©BBC



©martyn stewart
These sounds were recorded with a DPA Hydrophone placed underwater in the left channel and a Sennheiser MKH-20 placed above water in the right channel then mixed. (Unfortunately the DPA Hydrophone has been discontinued) The idea wasn’t to get a stereo field but to obtain the surface and underwater sounds of the same species simultaneously. This actual file was used in a TV production on Amphibians.
The deeper croaks are that of the Red-legged frog from underwater.

Pacific chorus frog

Sometimes referred to as the Pacific tree-frog, this frog gave us the “ribbet” in cartoons. There is nothing like the sounds of the pacific chorus frog at night in spring. This however is a single frog separated in a lone pond living quite happily.
This frog is chiefly nocturnal, spending the day beneath logs, rocks, or other debris. During breeding season, males will call to attract females. A number of calling males is known as a chorus. A dominant male, or chorus master, leads off the calling which is then followed by subordinate males. If an intruding male comes instead, the Pacific Tree-frog changes its usual two-part “ribbet” to a one-part encounter call. An observer trying to locate the Pacific Tree-frog can mimic their calls and take over as chorus master, enticing the other frogs to begin calling as well. If this is done, be prepared to take on the responsibilities that come with being the chorus master!

Pacific chorus frog

Pacific chorus frog

Geek notes:
Recorder: SD 722
Microphones:MKH 40/30 MS system
Tripod mounted with Rycote wind protector
Sample rate: 44.1k 24 bit
Time: 20:15
Date: 2010-05-04
Recordist: Martyn Stewart